Making it Stick – Preparing Solid Weight Loss Resolutions for 2007

September 19, 2009 · Filed Under Weight Loss Surgery · Comment 

Remember last year at this time? You set your new goals. You even wrote them down. You started with the best intentions. But your best weight loss objectives were neglected before the holiday decorations were even put away. What happened? Was there a bump in the road or did you just throw in the towel because it was too hard and you talked yourself out of it?

If you want a chance to make your 2007 resolutions stick, it is time to come to terms with how resolutions get pushed aside and what you can do about it.

Top Resolution Breakers

1. Your goal is unrealistic.

Example: I will lose 25 pounds by January 30.

Flawed Method: It is impractical to think you will able to lose that much weight so quickly and then to even fathom keeping it off and still remaining healthy. It is just not realistic. Even if you did, it would all be water weight and more importantly, you are going to be losing lean muscle mass.

Realistic Objectives: Set intentions that are sensible and reachable. Understand that losing a little less than a pound per week is healthier and practical for long-term results. Give yourself a fighting chance! It’s not the time frame that matters. It’s your health and well-being that are most important. The most significant thing is that you are moving forward and progressing toward your long-term goal.

2. You do not give yourself a chance to hit a bump in the road and you have no support system to get back on track.

Example: I will not eat sugary foods. No ifs, ands or buts.

Flawed Method: Great idea, but who can live like that? The most unrealistic frame of mind is thinking that you are “super human”. All it does is set you up for failure. If you were to have a slip, you would go into the all too familiar negative self-talk of telling yourself that you are a complete failure and that you are just not worth it.

Realistic Objectives: Set a “safety date” on your calendar for creating a plan of action with a “safety friend”, life coach or buddy who understands your challenges. In those cases where there might be weakness and/or emotions that cause you to go to food for solace, it is always comforting to know you have a safe place to fall and strategize to get back on target.

You might also think about creating a Plan B for yourself (e.g. take a walk until the temptation fades away). This way you can get back on track immediately. Just remember, most people who are successful at losing weight take it one step at a time. They begin by choosing moderation rather than abstinence and they always have back-up strategies.

3. You have too many resolutions or goals.

Example: By the end of January, I will lose 15 pounds, give up eating sweets, start going to the gym, (and the list goes on…)

Flawed Method:Too many goals at once stretch every priority too thin. Having too many goals is as bad as having no goals at all. Treating everything as important makes nothing important.

Realistic Objectives: Only a limited number of goals can be pursued at the same time. Pick your priorities. Write out an action plan that you can refer to. Take on one thing at a time, and remember that this is a New Year’s resolution, so you have 12 months to develop this new healthier lifestyle.

Chart out each goal, and then commit to starting each new endeavor month to month. For instance, you might plan to join a gym in January; in February you want to join a weight loss support group, etc. Set a start and check-up date for each goal so that you can track your progress.

The key is to commit to writing down your objectives and then either holding yourself accountable or asking for assistance in the process (life coach, buddy, etc.).

4. The resolution has no specific outcome.

Example: I will join the gym sometime this year.

Flawed Method: So you are intending on exercising at a gym. But is this today, tomorrow, or in December of 2007, when your actual goal is to lose the weight as soon as possible?

Realistic Objectives: How many pounds do you want to lose? How much is it going to cost you monthly for a gym membership? Is there still money left over for leisure activities and unexpected expenses (health issues, car problems, etc.)? A winning action plan outlines what to do, when to do it and how to assess it. For example, you can weigh yourself weekly, reviewing if you are on target or if your current nutritional and exercise plans are working toward your resolution. It then gives you a chance to make changes accordingly.

5. Someone else made your resolutions for you.

Example: I will reduce my waist size four inches by April (subtext: because my significant other wants me to wear the style of clothing that I wore when we first met.)

Flawed Method: If someone else has their own intentions for you, there will not be a need for self-empowerment. You will wind up becoming resentful and irritated at the resolution itself, if not at that someone who set you up in this self-deprecating situation.

Realistic Objectives: A New Year’s Resolution must be an empowering place because it is something you personally have thought about, planned and pursued in your own time and space. The outcome of the resolution itself must have a deep and important meaning to you. It must be valid enough for you to set your mind toward doing it. If you have a case where you would like to meet both partner’s needs, it is critical not to push one partner into an uninvited activity that gratifies the other.

New Year’s Resolutions can become a “jumping off place” for many, by altering areas in their life that require self-improvement. However, it can also be a time of struggle, depression and internal conflict. You can protect yourself and increase your chances for success by considering the above steps in advance of preparing your personal resolutions.

Copyright 2007 Jeff Cadwell


Jeff Cadwell Weight Loss Surgery Life Coach 714-669-2928 http://www.jeffcadwell.com “Welcome to the beginning of the New YOU!”I am a Life Coach who is passionate about empowering people to live more robust lives -physically, emotionally and spiritually. My specialty is people who are considering or have had Weight Loss Surgery.

Making it Stick – Preparing Sold Weight Loss Resolutions for 2007

September 18, 2009 · Filed Under Weight Loss Surgery · Comment 

Remember last year at this time? You set your new goals. You even wrote them down. You started with the best intentions. But your best weight loss objectives were neglected before the holiday decorations were even put away. What happened? Was there a bump in the road or did you just throw in the towel because it was too hard and you talked yourself out of it?

If you want a chance to make your 2007 resolutions stick, it is time to come to terms with how resolutions get pushed aside and what you can do about it.

Top Resolution Breakers

1. Your goal is unrealistic.

Example: I will lose 25 pounds by January 30.

Flawed Method: It is impractical to think you will able to lose that much weight so quickly and then to even fathom keeping it off and still remaining healthy. It is just not realistic. Even if you did, it would all be water weight and more importantly, you are going to be losing lean muscle mass.

Realistic Objectives: Set intentions that are sensible and reachable. Understand that losing a little less than a pound per week is healthier and practical for long-term results. Give yourself a fighting chance! It’s not the time frame that matters. It’s your health and well-being that are most important. The most significant thing is that you are moving forward and progressing toward your long-term goal.

2. You do not give yourself a chance to hit a bump in the road and you have no support system to get back on track.

Example: I will not eat sugary foods. No ifs, ands or buts.

Flawed Method: Great idea, but who can live like that? The most unrealistic frame of mind is thinking that you are “super human”. All it does is set you up for failure. If you were to have a slip, you would go into the all too familiar negative self-talk of telling yourself that you are a complete failure and that you are just not worth it.

Realistic Objectives: Set a “safety date” on your calendar for creating a plan of action with a “safety friend”, life coach or buddy who understands your challenges. In those cases where there might be weakness and/or emotions that cause you to go to food for solace, it is always comforting to know you have a safe place to fall and strategize to get back on target.

You might also think about creating a Plan B for yourself (e.g. take a walk until the temptation fades away). This way you can get back on track immediately. Just remember, most people who are successful at losing weight take it one step at a time. They begin by choosing moderation rather than abstinence and they always have back-up strategies.

3. You have too many resolutions or goals.

Example: By the end of January, I will lose 15 pounds, give up eating sweets, start going to the gym, (and the list goes on…)

Flawed Method:Too many goals at once stretch every priority too thin. Having too many goals is as bad as having no goals at all. Treating everything as important makes nothing important.

Realistic Objectives: Only a limited number of goals can be pursued at the same time. Pick your priorities. Write out an action plan that you can refer to. Take on one thing at a time, and remember that this is a New Year’s resolution, so you have 12 months to develop this new healthier lifestyle.

Chart out each goal, and then commit to starting each new endeavor month to month. For instance, you might plan to join a gym in January; in February you want to join a weight loss support group, etc. Set a start and check-up date for each goal so that you can track your progress.

The key is to commit to writing down your objectives and then either holding yourself accountable or asking for assistance in the process (life coach, buddy, etc.).

4. The resolution has no specific outcome.

Example: I will join the gym sometime this year.

Flawed Method: So you are intending on exercising at a gym. But is this today, tomorrow, or in December of 2007, when your actual goal is to lose the weight as soon as possible?

Realistic Objectives: How many pounds do you want to lose? How much is it going to cost you monthly for a gym membership? Is there still money left over for leisure activities and unexpected expenses (health issues, car problems, etc.)? A winning action plan outlines what to do, when to do it and how to assess it. For example, you can weigh yourself weekly, reviewing if you are on target or if your current nutritional and exercise plans are working toward your resolution. It then gives you a chance to make changes accordingly.

5. Someone else made your resolutions for you.

Example: I will reduce my waist size four inches by April (subtext: because my significant other wants me to wear the style of clothing that I wore when we first met.)


Flawed Method: If someone else has their own intentions for you, there will not be a need for self-empowerment. You will wind up becoming resentful and irritated at the resolution itself, if not at that someone who set you up in this self-deprecating situation.

Realistic Objectives: A New Year’s Resolution must be an empowering place because it is something you personally have thought about, planned and pursued in your own time and space. The outcome of the resolution itself must have a deep and important meaning to you. It must be valid enough for you to set your mind toward doing it. If you have a case where you would like to meet both partner’s needs, it is critical not to push one partner into an uninvited activity that gratifies the other.

New Year’s Resolutions can become a “jumping off place” for many, by altering areas in their life that require self-improvement. However, it can also be a time of struggle, depression and internal conflict. You can protect yourself and increase your chances for success by considering the above steps in advance of preparing your personal resolutions.

Copyright 2007 Jeff Cadwell

Jeff Cadwell Weight Loss Surgery Life Coach 714-669-2928 http://www.jeffcadwell.com “Welcome to the beginning of the New YOU!”I am a Life Coach who is passionate about empowering people to live more robust lives -physically, emotionally and spiritually. My specialty is people who are considering or have had Weight Loss Surgery.

Is Weight Loss Surgery for You?

June 22, 2009 · Filed Under vertical sleeve surgery · Comment 

Diet and exercise are the preferred twin partner methods for losing weight and excess body fat. A proper diet and age-appropriate, regular exercise will help almost anyone stay fit and in the correct weight range.

But, unfortunately for some, other methods are sometimes needed. Whether through long-term poor development of willpower, genetic disposition, disease or other factors, maintaining the proper weight for the obese sometimes requires outside assistance.

Fad diets rarely work, and almost never for very long. Some nutritional supplements and other compounds can help to a degree. But for many in this situation, weight loss surgery is the only hope.

There are many forms of surgery these days and all have pros and cons. The most important criteria are effectiveness, risk and side effects.

Surgical techniques have evolved over the past few decades, and most are effective, in the sense that they do typically lead to substantial weight loss. That loss comes about usually as the result of restricted caloric intake by eating less or by absorbing less of the food that is eaten.

One of the earliest forms was gastric bypass surgery. All or part of the stomach was removed and the digestive system reconnected. Originally extremely dangerous, it has evolved but still carries substantial risks. It is no longer the preferred method. Patients who undergo the procedure have to take supplements forever after and the risk of disease and nutritional deficiencies remains high.

Stomach stapling is one technique that has been around for many years now. Initially highly dangerous, it has become much safer in the past 10 years. There are still substantial risks, however, as with any major surgery.

The procedure consists of opening the patient and clamping portions of the stomach with specialized surgical staples. Newer methods sometimes make possible laparoscopy, in which a small hole is created through which the surgeon works, but the patient isn’t opened up.

There are risks of bleeding, though small. Patients can become ill if they attempt to eat more than the recommended amount. They may also suffer from nutritional deficiencies that can be lifelong, requiring supplements.

The net effect is to create a smaller stomach, leading to a more rapid feeling of fullness. The patient simply eats less and therefore takes in fewer calories. The body turns to stored fat for energy and the result is less fat and lower weight.

A newer form involves installing an adjustable Lap Band around the stomach. This eliminates the need to puncture the stomach and makes it possible for the physician to adjust the effect as the patient loses weight.


Generally safe, the procedure can be done on an outpatient basis. Most consider it a minor inconvenience, though like any medical procedure it’s expensive and insurance companies increasingly won’t pay for it. The band itself is not painful.

Patients typically experience rapid weight loss, but at the same time (as fat comes out of adipose tissue) many hormonal changes take place. Close, regular medical observation is important for the success of the procedure and the health of the patient.

There are dozens of names for the various procedures, Biliopancreatic Diversion, Vertical Banded Gastroplasty, Adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy (with or without Duodenal Switch), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and others. All are termed bariatric surgery.

But whichever procedure an individual considers, careful thought should be given to weighing the risks and benefits. For many, a commitment to long-term dietary and lifestyle changes is a better option. For those who believe surgery is the best option, consulting with an experienced physician is essential.

Each week, over one million people enjoy a fitness and wellness program created by John Spencer Ellis. His programs are implemented in the top resorts, spas and health clubs. John is the CEO of NESTA (National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association), the Spencer Institute for Life Coaching, and the Get America Fit Foundation.


He created Adventure Boot Camp, the largest fitness boot camp system in the world. His TriActive America signature series of outdoor exercise equipment is used worldwide. John has been featured on ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, FOX, FOX Sports, FOX Reality, SPIKE and ESPN. He is the fitness and lifestyle expert on Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Orange County and Daybreak OC (KDOC news). John is the producer of the documentary The Compass (Jan. 2009).